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Holli-Anne Passmore, Ph.D. Candidate

Ph.D. Candidate (2019)
Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia

Sessional Instructor - Department of Psychology
University of British Columbia - Kelowna, BC

Holli-Anne Passmore is a positive psychology researcher focusing on three main areas: 1) how connecting with nature can enhance well-being; 2) meaning in life; 3) the sense and experience of being alive. Her work has been published in several academic journals (e.g., Journal of Positive Psychology, Journal of Happiness Studies, International Journal of Wellbeing, and Journal of Pacific Rim Psychology) and books (e.g., International Contributions to the Study of Positive Mental Health, Positive Psychology among Children and Adolescents). Holli-Anne has presented her work at national and international conferences including the past four World Congresses on Positive Psychology, and conferences held by the Canadian Positive Psychology Association and the International Network on Personal Meaning. She has been an invited speaker at events such as The Gratitude Project and the 2015 Educating for Resilience conference. In March, 2017, GoGreenEx(Going Outdoors: Gathering Research Evidence on Environment and Exercise), an interdisciplinary research group based in Ireland, listed Holli-Anne as one of the women leading the way in environmental science whose endeavours have had an enormous impact on their work. Holli-Anne has received over $200,000 in grants and scholarship funding for her well-being research. Currently, Holli-Anne is collaborating with researchers in Canada, China, Dubai, Germany, Japan, Korea, and Russia.

In 2018, she was honoured to be one of 14 recipients (from over 100 nominations) to be awarded a Golden Apple Award -- a student-initiated award recognizing instructors/professors who excel at structuring and delivering course material effectively to help students find value in the subject matter and learning process. In 2017, Holli-Anne received the UBC Provost's Award for Teaching Assistance Excellence. Her teaching experience includes: Positive Psychology, Psychology of Meaning, and co-instructing Research Methods.

As a researcher and PhD student, Holli-Anne has mentored 18 undergrad students over the past three years in their participation in her research lab, the Nature-Meaning in Life Lab, Nature-MILL, as directed/independent study students and as research assistants. Her students have presented research results at UBC’s Undergraduate Research Conference, and at national and international psychology conferences (through both poster and oral paper presentations). Two of her (now former) students will be starting graduate studies this fall having now chosen from offers they received at different institutions in Ontario, Nova Scotia, and BC; one of her students was awarded the $6500 Undergraduate Research Award; another student recently won third place ($950) for his paper submission to the International Conference in Meaning (particularly notable as the first and second place winners, as well as the honourable mentions are all PhD students); and three of my students have won Tuum Est Student Initiative awards ($500 each). She has also mentored numerous students as a term-instructor, graduate co-instructor, and teaching assistant.

In the media, Holli-Anne's work on nature and well-being is featured on UC Berkeley's Greater Good Science Center's website, Greater Good in Action, as a pratical intervention to enhance well-being. Her work has also been featured in Psychology Today, SeniorsNews based in Australia, Positive Acorn, and the New York Daily News. Radio interviews include Roundhouse Radio in Vancouver and a half-hour feature on TerraInforma (Edmonton) discussing nature, well-being, and meaning in life.

Recently, Holli-Anne was Pavan Mehat's guest on his YouTube channel, speaking about her research and other research on how nature can enhance our well-being.