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The University of British Columbia
UBC Okanagan

Dr. Johannus (John) A. Janmaat

Dr. Johannus (John) A. Janmaat
Associate Professor of Economics
University of British Columbia
3333 University Way
Kelowna, British Columbia
V1V 1V7

Office: ART231
Phone: (250) 807-8021
E-mail: john.janmaat@ubc.ca

Curriculum Vitae

Official University of British Columbia Curriculum Vitae

Education

  • Ph.D. Queen's University at Kingston Completed May 2002. Environmental and Resource Economics, Econometrics "Four Papers in Environmental and Experimental Economics".
  • M.B.A. Simon Fraser University Completed August 1996. Concentration in Finance "Unintended Consequences of Grouping on tests of the Capital Asset Pricing Model".
  • M.Sc. (Agr.) The University of British Columbia Completed August 1994. Agricultural Economics "The Impact of Supply Management on Agricultural Marketing Cooperatives".
  • B.Sc. (Agr.) The University of British Columbia Completed April 1992. Agricultural Economics "A Dyamic Programming Analysis of the Gross Revenue Insurance Program".

Research Areas

  • The Economics of Water Resources:
    Managing water to maximize its value to society. The use of economic incentives in water management. Incentives and motivators that drive water use. Identifying those water uses that generate the greatest value to society.
  • Applied Environmental Economics:
    Measuring the value of environmental assets which are not traded. Designing policy instruments that reward environmental stewardship. Balancing the costs and benefits of alternative policies that impact on the environment.
  • Bioeconomics:
    Modelling the relationship between biological and economic systems.

Teaching Areas

  • Environmental Economics
  • Natural Resource Economics
  • Development Economics
  • Cost-Benefit Analysis
  • Experimental Economics

Recent Publications

Please check out the CV link above for a (hopefully) current list of publications, and go to the Working Papers link to see some current research.

Biography

I was born in Chilliwack, British Columbia, and spent the first 20 years of my life there. My parents operated a dairy farm, and until I left for university, my summers and many other hours during the year were spent working on the farm. My first two degrees are in agricultural economics, in part because for many years I was considering taking over the family farm. While that didn't happen, I still have a soft spot for the farming life.

After three years studying at what was then Fraser Valley College, while living at home and working on the farm, I moved to Vancouver to continue my studies at UBC. My years at FVC and initially at UBC were rather unfocussed, enabling me to pick up the equivalent of third year math and biology, second year physics and chemistry, and a smattering of courses from political science through to Latin. I eventually settled in the Faculty of Agriculture, where I completed a degree in agricultural economics.

With a University Graduate Fellowship and a longing to be close to the woman that I would later marry, I began a masters in agricultural economics in 1996. After completing this degree in 1998, I then moved to SFU where my then wife was studying her Ph.D., and completed an MBA with a concentration in finance. With our first child on the way, we postponed our plans to take a year and climb all of the Cascade volcanoes, and moved to Kingson, Ontario where I would complete my Ph.D.

During my doctoral studies I focussed on environmental and natural resource economics, and econometrics. My intial research interest lay with sustainability and limits to growth. However, an opportunity to study the sustainability of irrigated agriculture in India presented itself, and I jumped at it. This lead to a fascinating trip to India and a frustrating exercise in trying to do effective multidisciplinary work. Most of the multidisciplinary character of the work was abandoned in my disseration, but the experience did help confirm to me that working across disciplines is necessary, although it must be done carefully if good results are to be generated.

After four years at Queen's, with an incomplete dissertation, and now two children, I needed a job. There was a short term teaching position available at Acadia University in Nova Scotia, which subsequenly turned into a tenure track and then tenured position. However, for personal and professional reasons, moving back west was a longing that was ever present, and when UBC opened the Okanagan campus, I began applying. Being third time lucky, I was given a position in 2006, which I assumed in 2007. Unfortunately, marriages don't always last, and mine didn't survive this transition. As such, I do continue to have a very strong connection to that place where my children live, which is presently in Wolfville, Nova Scotia.